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8103 Views 5 Replies Latest reply: Feb 28, 2011 8:00 PM by jiggawhat RSS

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4. What is the purpose of network interconnections?

Nov 6, 2009 3:23 AM

GOOD ANSWER

to connect separate networks and filter the traffic over those networks so that the data is transmitted through the most efficient route

 

Good Answer but shorter

to choose the path over which data is sent to its destination

 

Good Answer too

to provide a means for data to travel from one point to another in the network

 

Good Answer......

to provide network attachment to the end systems and intelligent switching of the data within the local network

 

 

Now here is the kicker.... Since this is the english language and not good old binary bits of Zeros and Ones the answer is being left up to interpretation of the reader there is no proper context..........

 

So what is the purpose of the question?????

  • Scott Morris - CCDE/4xCCIE/2xJNCIE 8,397 posts since
    Oct 7, 2008

    Which brings us to the further question of what's the purpose of the post?  

     

    Network interconnections will allow separate autonomous networks to communicate.  Since communication is inherently a "path" of traffic, then in order to talk outside your own closed system, you need some sort of interconnection.

     

    Scott

  • IntegrationArchitect 1,126 posts since
    Aug 14, 2009

    Purpose is to see if you purchased Cisco Press, or attended network acadamy and it is probably in there somewhere.

    .

    I believe a deep level of frustration is experienced when a student gets a vague question that does not seem to be teaching anything substantive. Questions like this can be included so less students get 100% and the exam authors are penalized for making a test too easy. Questions like this are better for students with no hands on or other certifications at all because knowing too much practical knowledge will make you overthink al the answers and become clouded.

    .

    I suggest pick the simple and direct answer and strip the secondary goals like Network intelligence and efficiency and go with the pure and raw:

    to provide a means for data to travel from one point to another in the network “  // but hold on that is a LAN so not the correct answer.

     

     

    it's physical only here to get from A to B and other goals would be STP or QOS or routing convergence protocols and efficiecies should be called out in the question if that is what they want you to prove that you learned. ...

     

    However if you follow the Intra vs. InterNet logic then this question implies several LAN networks over a routed WAN senario so first one listed is correct.

     

    more:

    Intranet: implies layer 2, private IP, collision domains, VLANs, trunking and can be lifted up to LAYER 3 VLAN routing, trusted

    .

    Inernet: implies layer 3, public IP, classfull address, router egress at serial removes collision domain issues and sends out optimized public address only communication. little or no security, untrusted, and can be lifted up to filtered traffic, and can participate with the carriers protocols like MPLS for efficiency of routing convergence and best traffic path

  • Chris Buscemi 203 posts since
    Mar 16, 2009

    It may seem frustrating that there are multiple answers, however if you truly pay attention to what the question asks, you'll see there is only one answer.

     

    What is the purpose of network interconnections?

     

         Well, the question is, why connect two networks together? And that goes to exactly what Scott pointed out. Networks are their own autonomous systems. And in order for the hosts on one network to communicate with the hosts from another network, we need to Interconnect them. So the first answer is the only one.

     

     

    An L2 switch can choose the path that data is sent to reach its destination by either flooding to all its port or forwarding out a specific port. So that answer doesn't just apply to Internetworks as it can be done Intra-network.

     

    And the next two answers you have listed both say either "a network" or the "local network" and that tells you right there, it has nothing to do with internetworks.

     

     

    Take your time to make sure you really grasp what the question is asking. If you find yourself in a situation where all of the answers seem right, then you probably have misread, or at the very least under read the question.

     

     

    I hope that helps.

     

     

    Chris

  • jiggawhat 1 posts since
    Nov 18, 2008

    I guess I took this by process of elimination... according to Cisco...

    to connect separate networks and filter the traffic over those networks so that the data is transmitted through the most efficient route
    Purpose of routers - to choose the path over which data is sent to its destination
    Purpose of media - to provide a means for data to travel from one point to another in the network
    Purpose of switches - to provide network attachment to the end systems and intelligent switching of the data within the local network

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