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4029 Views 24 Replies Latest reply: May 9, 2011 1:03 PM by Michel RSS 1 2 Previous Next

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What is your definition for a "LAN network"

Mar 30, 2011 4:33 AM

Michel 214 posts since
Mar 10, 2011

Hi,

 

Thanks very much if you can write your definition for LAN network.

 

We are in 2011. Perhaps, it is not useful to talk about collisions, half duplex, shared media, hubs.

 

Best regards,

Michel

  • Currently Being Moderated
    1. Mar 30, 2011 5:00 AM (in response to Michel)
    Re: What is your definition for a "LAN network"

    I can agree with you that those topics you listed are old technology, but it's how we got where we are today.  What's wrong with learning the history of networks?

  • Jürgen Dietl 58 posts since
    Jul 21, 2008
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    2. Mar 30, 2011 6:04 AM (in response to Michel)
    Re: What is your definition for a "LAN network"

    It also helps you understand some network technology. And in some companies there are still hubs etc.

    cheers,

  • Steven Williams 3,266 posts since
    Jan 26, 2009
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    3. Mar 30, 2011 7:11 AM (in response to Jürgen Dietl)
    Re: What is your definition for a "LAN network"

    Some companies are still using token ring.

  • Paul Stewart  -  CCIE Security, CCSI 6,993 posts since
    Jul 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    5. Mar 30, 2011 7:41 AM (in response to Michel)
    Re: What is your definition for a "LAN network"

    What is my definition of a LAN Network?  I typically would actually refer to it as a LAN or a Local Area Network.  LAN Network seems a bit redundant, but so does NIC Card (well I guess that depends on if NIC = Network Interface Card or Controller). 

     

    In any case, I think of a LAN as a local network.  Not a network that connects across town, even in the case of metro ethernet.  With a LAN, the enterprise typically owns all the components including all of the cabling and switches.  This stuff is a bit grayer than it used to be.  Today we often use LAN interfaces and technology to connect to a WAN. 

  • Currently Being Moderated
    6. Mar 30, 2011 7:48 AM (in response to Michel)
    Re: What is your definition for a "LAN network"

    Don't forget that a lot of those terms still appy in the wireless arena, because radio is a shared medium.

     

    As far as learning the history, I think it is beneficial in the long run, but not necessarily required in the short term.  Learning how networks work CURRENTLY, I believe is far more beneficial in getting a job or promotion in the near future.  Long term, the more you know the better off you are regardless.

     

     

    Edit to add - I usually reserve the "LAN" reference to a campus network, or a datacenter.   The term "segment" I think is a better fit for small switched mediums say between routers for failover.  

  • Paul Stewart  -  CCIE Security, CCSI 6,993 posts since
    Jul 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    8. Mar 30, 2011 8:15 AM (in response to Michel)
    Re: What is your definition for a "LAN network"

    I'm certainly not excluding myself from my own criticism.  I do use the terminology "IP Protocol" all the time.  Very good point.

  • Martin 13,077 posts since
    Jan 16, 2009
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    10. Mar 30, 2011 9:04 PM (in response to Michel)
    Re: What is your definition for a "LAN network"

    it depends on where you are: LAN is my living room; or my house or building, or campus (although you could use campus area network).

     

    if you use historical perspective on definition of LAN, it would be LAN contains switches and hosts and stops at router.

    Beyound router is WAN.

  • Paul Stewart  -  CCIE Security, CCSI 6,993 posts since
    Jul 18, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    11. Mar 31, 2011 2:46 AM (in response to Martin)
    Re: What is your definition for a "LAN network"

    I too would say beyond a router is WAN.  This is true as long as it is connected to a wider geographic area and going across 3rd party cabling and switches.  It is entirely possible that a router is connecting two or more LANs in the same local area.  In that case, I'd still consider it a LAN.

  • Jared 5,502 posts since
    Jul 27, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    14. Mar 31, 2011 5:35 PM (in response to tnewshott)
    Re: What is your definition for a "LAN network"

    What a neat discussion.  Although those terms of collision domain, half duplex and shared media seem to be antiquated, it is aboslutely amazing to see how they still apply in todays networks.  People still use hubs.  All of those concepts still apply in the wireless arena, as Travis pointed out.

     

    I would personally consider the WLAN an extension of the LAN as it uses the LAN as its backbone, typically.  If the routing device aggregates one or more LANS to a point to point or point to multipoint link, I would consider that WAN.  But if it is just allowing 2 broadcast domains to talk to each other with no aggregation to a 3rd network.... I wouldn't consider that a WAN.

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