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8063 Views 10 Replies Latest reply: Jul 2, 2012 6:44 AM by Aaron Francis RSS

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Difference between Local VLANs and End-to-End VLANs?

Sep 16, 2010 11:44 PM

Dada Khalander 114 posts since
Sep 28, 2009

Hi All,

 

Can you please brief the difference between Local VLANs and End-to-End VLANs? And which is used under what condition/circumstance?

 

 

 

Thanks & Regards,

S. Dada Khalander.

  • Conwyn 7,907 posts since
    Sep 10, 2008

    Hi Dada

     

    I am guessing local vlans are the vlans within a group of connected switches but there is no reason why you can not use fibre optics to connect switches many miles / kilometres apart.

     

    End to End vlans - I guess this is where you have a vlan at one site connected to a vlan at another site. This can be achieved by using frame-relay circuits or QinQ technology or MPLS  if the option above is not available

     

    Regards Conwyn

  • Conwyn 7,907 posts since
    Sep 10, 2008

    Hi Dada

     

    VTP runs at L2. These technologies carry the L2 packets transparently. So VTP would be unaware generally but QinQ requires specific attention to the configuration.  I have run L2  over GRE over PPP over ISDN so you can have physically seperate vlans with VTP.

     

    Regards Conwyn

  • Conwyn 7,907 posts since
    Sep 10, 2008

    Hi Dada

     

    You do not. You use them to provide a carrier. For example bridging. This takes the Ethernet packet from one location and takes it to another.

     

    Since VTP is an Ethernet packet. It carries the VTP information to the other end.

     

    Before IP bridging was the norm for connecting networks together and Cisco still supports it in many ways.

     

    Regards Conwyn

  • Conwyn 7,907 posts since
    Sep 10, 2008

    Hi Dada

     

    I have never tried this on a switch.

     

    bridge irb

    int port-channel64

    no ip address

    interface port-channel64.1

    encapsulation dot1q 1 native

    bridge-group 1

    int fa1/0

    no switchport

    no ip address

    channel-group 64

    int bvi1

    ip address A.B.C.D 255.255.255.252

    bridge 1 protocol ieee

    bridge 1 route ip

     

    This should carry all the native vlan traffic between the two switches over the link. Note that CDP/VTP are technically not in a vlan but it is easier to pretend they are in vlan native.

     

    If you only want VTP/CDP traffic then put a ACL on the interface. If you want multiple vlans you will have to replicate all the "1"s

     

    Regards Conwyn

     

    Extracted from http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/switches/ps607/products_configuration_example09186a008014c203.shtml

  • Conwyn 7,907 posts since
    Sep 10, 2008
    Currently Being Moderated
    8. Sep 17, 2010 2:48 PM (in response to Conwyn)
    Re: Difference between Local VLANs and End-to-End VLANs?

    Hi Dada

     

    I took a 2691 with a switch module NM-ESW  and defined fa1/0 as a trunk

    I connected this to a 7200 and put bridging on fa0/1

    I connected using fa0/0 to second 7200 fa0/0 and defined a port channel with BVI between them.

    I connected the second 7200 fa0/1 to the second 2691.

    I ran VTP on both 2691 as VTP masters and vlans were replicated quite happily.

    So I think your switch configuration should work but remember you are joining the vlans together.

     

    Regards Conwyn

     

    SWITCHA
    !
    interface FastEthernet1/0
    switchport mode trunk

     

    SWITCHA#show vtp counters
    VTP statistics:
    Summary advertisements received    : 6
    Subset advertisements received     : 5
    Request advertisements received    : 1
    Summary advertisements transmitted : 6
    Subset advertisements transmitted  : 5
    Request advertisements transmitted : 0

    !
    7200A
    !
    bridge irb
    interface Port-channel64
    no ip address
    bridge-group 1
    !
    interface FastEthernet0/0
    no ip address
    duplex full
    speed 100
    channel-group 64
    !        
    interface FastEthernet0/1
    no ip address
    duplex full
    speed 100
    bridge-group 1
    !        
    interface BVI1
    ip address 10.0.0.1 255.255.255.252
    !        
    bridge 1 protocol ieee
    bridge 1 route ip

     

    7200B
    !
    bridge irb
    !interface Port-channel64
    no ip address
    bridge-group 1
    !
    interface FastEthernet0/0
    no ip address
    duplex full
    speed 100
    channel-group 64
    !
    interface FastEthernet0/1
    no ip address
    duplex full
    speed 100
    bridge-group 1
    !
    interface BVI1
    ip address 10.0.0.2 255.255.255.252

    bridge 1 protocol ieee
    bridge 1 route ip

     

    SWITCHB
    !
    interface FastEthernet1/0
    switchport mode trunk

     

    SWITCHB#show vtp counters
    VTP statistics:
    Summary advertisements received    : 5
    Subset advertisements received     : 4
    Request advertisements received    : 0
    Summary advertisements transmitted : 7
    Subset advertisements transmitted  : 5
    Request advertisements transmitted : 1

  • Aaron Francis 123 posts since
    Jan 19, 2011

    Umm I figured Id comment here just in case anyone else stopped pulls this up in a Google search. End-to-end VLANS are actually vlans that cross teh enterprise network say frmo closet to closet or building to building...(ex. Vlan 10 exists on 5 or 6 switches spanning numerous closets or buildings). Local VLANs are VLANs that are configured on a per switch basis (possibly a few switches based on geographic location) and DO NOT span across teh network. (ex. Vlan 10-User on sw_1, Vlan11_user on sw_2, Vlan 12_user on sw_3, etc.) The idea is to break up what was once a large vlan into smaller vlan segments for troubleshooting purposes amongst other things. 

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