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    Being thrown to the fire on my first job

    Kelly r Washburn

      Hi everyone.  I am so glad to be in this group.  I guess I am scared if I get hired after obtaining my CCNA cert, then most companies expect you to produce immediately.  But, my worst fear is that I will just know what I studied to get my certification and no real world experience.  Being a Cisco network engineer would work well for me if I get the chance to be part of a team of experts to learn from.  Cisco information is good to know for the CCNA exam, but I won't have any real world experience.  I just can't let my fears of being fired or let go in my job because I don't know some details that I could only get in the real world.  Thanks everyone in this group for supporting everyone and encouraging everyone.  Kelly Washburn.

        • 1. Re: Being thrown to the fire on my first job
          Ing_Percy

          Hi!

           

          In some jobs as technical support or NOC analyst, the company capacitates to their new workers, so , don't worry, you must believe in your abilities.

           

          Regards!

          • 2. Re: Being thrown to the fire on my first job
            Steven Davidson

            You'll just have to cross that bridge when you get to it.

            • 3. Re: Being thrown to the fire on my first job
              Kaung Htet Aung

              I know your feeling bro.  I'm working as field support at maker company who is one of the competitor of Cisco. I have the knowledge level of CCNA(R&S).  I got the a lot of pressure because I don't have any Data center technical knowledge.  They want me to understand the customer's requirement & solve a lot of problems with other SE level.  So, don't afraid bro.  You must learn a lot under pressure. We only need to work with passion. Good luck!

              • 4. Re: Being thrown to the fire on my first job
                arteq

                surviving the fire makes you stronger...

                • 5. Re: Being thrown to the fire on my first job
                  Steven Davidson

                  arteq wrote:

                   

                  surviving the fire makes you stronger...

                  Any firefighter will tell you that it’s usually the smoke inhalation that will do you in first.   You have to survive the smoke inhalation.   Then the fire.  It’s a two-step process really...

                  • 6. Re: Being thrown to the fire on my first job
                    Conwyn

                    Hi Kelly

                     

                    There is more to the world than Cisco so you are unlikely to have a "Cisco only" job. You may be exposed to other new areas.

                    Nobody knows everything that is why we have Google.

                    So always be ready to learn because technology changes over time.

                     

                    Regards Conwyn

                    • 7. Re: Being thrown to the fire on my first job
                      Steven Williams

                      This is very true. I have never been in a "Cisco Only Network". My first role as a network admin was a school network that consisted of HP ProCurve, Sonic Wall, Cisco, and Dell.

                       

                      I think the key is to be a good engineer you dont need to know everything, but need to know how to find the answers.

                       

                      And really most of my job then was 80 percent operations which was troubleshooting or doing Move, Adds, and Changes in a network. Very rarely was I designing and deploying new networks.

                       

                      Even today as an Engineer I would say I get to do maybe 2-3 LARGE projects a year and everything else is troubleshooting or fine tuning.

                       

                      You will be just fine, we all have to start somewhere.

                      • 8. Re: Being thrown to the fire on my first job
                        JasonW

                        Hey Kelly there are so many factors at play here: What was the employer's expectation of your experience level? Surely you were honest and your resume reflected that you have little real world experience? If a manager or employer can't work with that, then the fault is on THEM if you have to go.

                         

                        However, tell us more about the role? Maybe we can give you some real world experience advice based on that? What are you primarily supporting? (random left field question based on my exp next>) Do you have a CCNA, and they expect you on week 2 to jump in and plan & configure a small office voice over IP system... because you're a CCNA? (LOL it happened to me).

                         

                        That being said, I will assume a few things: You got your CCNA & you'll be supporting servers, PCs, and all devices that plug into your (single company) network? You're about to face a barrage of random questions about the network, and asking you why something doesn't work! That being said, you will need to have some fundamentals down PAT... like DHCP, traffic flows, ACL & is anything getting blocked anywhere in your network? Is it all layer 2 inside the LAN, and only routes when going across the WAN/internet connection?

                         

                        How does DHCP work on a windows machine, what is the DORA process, and how does that process flow across your network? Where is your DHCP server located? Does the Windows client reach the DHCP server by layer2 broadcast the whole way, or does it get routed by a dhcp-helper?

                         

                        OSI model: How solid are you with it? If you only learned it for the book, LIVE your new tech life everyday running all scenarios youre faced with - through the OSI. What's happening at what layers? (Troubleshooting 101) Always view the situation through OSI glasses & that will help you a ton.

                         

                        Websites: How does the traffic flow to the internet? is there a web filter or proxy in place? Depending what model you have, is there a way for you to test & troubleshoot traffic issues?

                         

                        All of the things I mentioned have almost nothing to do with Cisco - they come down to industry standard whitepapers! I suggest you read the one on DHCP - being an expert on that will help you through your career.

                         

                        Those are all just general wisdoms I've built over the years - good luck and give us some more information to help you better! ;-)

                        • 9. Re: Being thrown to the fire on my first job
                          Samer

                          Kelly r Washburn wrote:

                           

                          Hi everyone.  I am so glad to be in this group.  I guess I am scared if I get hired after obtaining my CCNA cert, then most companies expect you to produce immediately.  But, my worst fear is that I will just know what I studied to get my certification and no real world experience.  Being a Cisco network engineer would work well for me if I get the chance to be part of a team of experts to learn from.  Cisco information is good to know for the CCNA exam, but I won't have any real world experience.  I just can't let my fears of being fired or let go in my job because I don't know some details that I could only get in the real world.  Thanks everyone in this group for supporting everyone and encouraging everyone.  Kelly Washburn.

                          If you are working in a technical job with experienced technical manager/team leader/supervisor they should know your limits, so don't worry.

                          mostly they will be looking at your progress and adaptation. knowledge comes later.

                          good luck!

                          • 10. Re: Being thrown to the fire on my first job
                            Ron

                            Take a deep breath. We all feel the fear when starting a new job. There are things that you can do to enhance your position. I remember my 1st big position with an oil and gas company we had golf carts to get around campus. On the fist day I got the golf cart stuck in the mud. The engineer I was with laughed and we still laugh about it. 20 years later. You will do

                            1. Don't be afraid to ask questions. Be sure to network (develop relationships) No one is going to expect you to understand their environment right away. So learn the landscape.

                            a. ask for documentation  that includes: on the processes, ask for a flow chart of the environment, read up on the back plane(manufacturers whitepapers). If there is none ask to create documentation for on-boarding

                            2. Find a mentor

                            3. Create a home lab to simulate the work environment

                            4. Join local user groups


                            You will do great. Challenge yourself to continue to learn.

                            • 11. Re: Being thrown to the fire on my first job
                              Mikey Mikey Mike

                              By the sound of your question you are conscientious enough that you'll do OK!

                               

                              From my experience:

                              1 - Google & Youtube are your friend.

                              2 - Saying "I don't know, but let me go find out" is any managers favorite answer. And even then there's no shame in coming back 48hrs later and saying "I just cant figure this one out" and handing it off.

                              3 - If you get gven a task anyone who is worth your time will help you, knowing one day they'll need your help.

                              4 - Diamonds are formed by putting coal under enormous pressure. If you want to be a diamond then these experiences will make you.

                               

                              Best of luck in your new job and just remember your next job will never be as stressful as this one (until it is)

                              • 12. Re: Being thrown to the fire on my first job
                                John Schubert

                                Take tons of notes.  Your first day on the job you should have a binder.  Start writing  everything you do.  Commands that you use often.   Network topology.  If you fix or watch something fixed, write down how it was fixed.  This builds your arsenal and experience to pull from.

                                • 13. Re: Being thrown to the fire on my first job
                                  Ron

                                  Hi Kelly

                                   

                                  Any update on the new position?

                                  • 14. Re: Being thrown to the fire on my first job
                                    JasonW

                                    relating to that binder comment above: Using an app like Evernote for long term storage of those notes is a great idea, too. ;-)

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